As I am huffing and puffing away, wondering whether an extra month of training would make my climb breezier; my mountain guide, Deo (spelling un-confirmed), turns around and say in consolation, “don’t worry, kita pelan-pelan saja (let’s just go slowly).” Meet Mount Trus Madi, the second highest mountain in Sabah and Malaysia (2, 642 meters […]

Trusmadi Wayaan Mannan
As I am huffing and puffing away, wondering whether an extra month of training would make my climb breezier; my mountain guide, Deo (spelling un-confirmed), turns around and say in consolation, “don’t worry, kita pelan-pelan saja (let’s just go slowly).”

Trusmadi Wayaan Mannan
Meet Mount Trus Madi, the second highest mountain in Sabah and Malaysia (2, 642 meters high) after Mount Kinabalu and probably the best mental and physical endurance test in Sabah. Mount Trus Madi, which is classified as a Class 1 Forest Reserve, is thickly covered in moss and is so heavily foliaged. The atmosphere is dewy and the ground squelches with every step I take. I faintly remember my first time climbing the Mount Trusmadi, which was almost seven years ago. But that was via the Wayaan Kaingaran (Tambunan) route — two more wayaan (trails), namely Wayaan Mannan (from Kampung Sinua, Sook) and Wayaan Mastan (from Apin Apin, Keningau).

Trusmadi Wayaan Mannan Trail
Overall, all the trails leading to the Mount Trusmadi peak are more challenging than the Mount Kinabalu trail. However, comparing all three trails, Wayaan Mannan — the trail we’re trekking on — is said to be the most challenging and Wayaan Kaingaran being the easiest. Our journey from Camp 1, Kampung Sinua starts at 8.30am after having breakfast and a pep-talk session by our head mountain guide, Mr. Dennis Ikon. The distance from the starting point to the Trusmadi summit is 11.3 kilometres.

Rhododendron

A true haven for naturalists, there are numerous species of plants to be spotted Mount Trus Madi such as exotic orchids, the castanopsis nuts (oak), rhododendrons (which contains anti-inflammatory and liver-protective properties), and lichen (used as fever and toothache medication). Mount Trus Madi is also well-known for its population of pitcher plants, hence being nicknamed ‘nepenthes garden’. The most notable species of pitcher plant is the Nepenthes x trusmadiensis—a natural hybrid between Nepenthes lowii and Nepenthes macrophylla—which is endemic to Mount Trus Madi only.

Trusmadi Camp 2
At 2.30pm, after approximately six hours of climbing, we finally reach the Camp 2 where we would be resting before commencing with the summit climb the next morning. I must mention that Camp 2 is the very definition of Spartan. Being nothing but a simple zinc-roofed hut with 30 canvas hammocks, the next challenge for me (and other climbers) is to make myself comfortable. With the temperature dipping to less than 8 degrees Celsius at night, I owe much of my comfort to a zero-degree sleeping bag.

Sleeping bag
Armed with gloves, a LED headlamp, ample water and energy bar supply, and tons of grit; we continue the second leg of our climb to the summit at 1.30am. This part of the climb is significantly harder than the first since the terrain to the summit is a lot steeper. Apart from having to be clever about footwork, a climber must also be wary of grabbing thorny wild rattan trees along the way.

Trusmadi peak at dawn
Nearly five hours of mud-splattered climb later, Deo points at a familiar looking peak, concealed by wafts of mist and thin white clouds—it’s Mount Kinabalu. I sit on a rock and wait for the sun to appear. They say the view of Mount Kinabalu at sunrise from the summit of Mount Trus Madi is the best ever; and at the first glimpse of sunrise peeking from behind Mount Kinabalu, I know exactly what they mean. The view makes the climb so rewarding!

 


 

Go trekking with us!

The Orang Sungai, literally ‘River People’, is one of Sabah’s officially recognized 32 ethnic groups. They reside mainly in the rural areas along the Kinabatangan River, Paitan, Labuk and Kudat. The majority of the Orang Sungai community embraces Islam as their religion, being one of the few ethnic groups in Sabah to have inherited Islam […]

The Orang Sungai, literally ‘River People’, is one of Sabah’s officially recognized 32 ethnic groups. They reside mainly in the rural areas along the Kinabatangan River, Paitan, Labuk and Kudat.

The majority of the Orang Sungai community embraces Islam as their religion, being one of the few ethnic groups in Sabah to have inherited Islam from their ancestors. However, there are a minor some who embrace Christianity too.

Although most of the Orang Sungai youths have migrated to the city and work in the corporate world, old generation Orang Sungai people subsist on agrarian lifestyle, focusing on a range of traditional occupations from farming to fishing.

Like other major ethnic groups in Sabah, such as the Kadazandusun and Murut communities, the Orang Sungai community celebrates the end of harvest. Usually, the thanksgiving celebration incorporates a week-long gong-beating ceremony as a sign of bountiful harvest. Other than that, the big celebration includes singing and the performing of their traditional ethnic dance called Titikas.

This end-of-harvest celebration will normally be held at the Village Head’s residence. During the celebration, a variety of Orang Sungai traditional delicacies will be served to the guests.

The Orang Sungai community also observes a unique wedding custom. According to ancient belief, the bride and groom are prohibited from meeting each other on the day of the wedding until it is time for the wedding ceremony to be held. They believe that meeting before the wedding ceremony will bring bad luck. During the wedding ceremony, the bride’s family members will be singing songs in order to chase away bad luck and evil spirits.

The Orang Sungai of Kinabatangan

The state of Sabah, on the island of Borneo, is often promoted as an outdoorsman’s paradise. And Sabah’s Semporna archipelago — particularly the island of Sipadan – has been described by Jacques Cousteau as some of the best diving in the world. The teardrop-shaped island is perched atop practically sheer sea walls that plunge some […]

The state of Sabah, on the island of Borneo, is often promoted as an outdoorsman’s paradise. And Sabah’s Semporna archipelago — particularly the island of Sipadan – has been described by Jacques Cousteau as some of the best diving in the world.

The teardrop-shaped island is perched atop practically sheer sea walls that plunge some 2000m to the bottom of the Celebes Sea. On the surface, Sipadan is a tropical break in the expansive vista of oceanic blue; underwater, the geographic waypoint acts as a feeding trough for thousands of marine life specimens, from soft banking sea turtles and schools of hammerhead sharks to water monitor lizards that bring conjure images of old dinosaur monster movies.

Unfortunately, you cannot just show up and plunge into the waters off Sipadan’s coast. A complicated system of permits and passes means dive outfits based in either the town of Semporna or on one of the archipelago’s other islands can only take a certain number of guests to Sipadan each day. It is also recommended that divers possess an advanced open water diving certification. All of this means that one of the most beautiful collections of islands in southeast Asia tends to attract skilled diving enthusiasts, often to the exclusion of other tourists.

However, there are areas of the Semporna archipelago that are perfect for novice divers, and even those who are not interested in diving at all. Mabul, which is popular with both chic luxury-resort divers and young backpackers, is world famous for its ‘muck-diving’, where explorers poke around at the fascinating marine life that settles into silty mud located not too far off shore. Beginner diving courses are offered across Mabul, as well as on the small island of Kapalai and through outfitters in the town of Semporna.

Every dive and tour operator also arranges snorkeling trips where you will have a good chance of spotting clouds of rainbow-coloured fish and graceful sea turtles. In fact, a snorkeling experience can often provide better access to the marine wildlife. First-time divers must concentrate on technique and safety training that may preclude them from really watching the undersea world, and snorkelers may see just as much as shallow divers given the excellent visibility in the archipelago. In addition, snorkeling prices are typically less than half that of diving rates.

While the Semporna islands are not large enough to be considered true ‘resort’ islands, they do possess very small swathes of white sand and beautiful tropical sunsets. Mabul is populated by an interesting mix of Malay fishermen and Bajau sea gypsies, and it is always a pleasure to see the colourful boats of both ethnic groups return from a day on the surf.

When you are in Kinabalu Park, be sure to make your way to the Botanical Garden where you can enjoy a refreshing short hike while feasting your eyes on the beautiful things of nature. Nestled somewhere in between Liwagu Restaurant and Kinabalu Hall, Mount Kinabalu Botanical Garden, which is also known as the Mountain Garden […]

When you are in Kinabalu Park, be sure to make your way to the Botanical Garden where you can enjoy a refreshing short hike while feasting your eyes on the beautiful things of nature.

Nestled somewhere in between Liwagu Restaurant and Kinabalu Hall, Mount Kinabalu Botanical Garden, which is also known as the Mountain Garden is one of Kinabalu Park’s best kept secrets. Many people are not aware of the existence of the Botanical Garden due to its secluded location, however, it has been around since 1981 and is the biggest botanical gardens in Sabah after the Tenom Agriculture Park.

Kinabalu Park has one of the richest assemblage of flora in the world, with an estimate of 5,000 to 6,000 vascular plant species that cover the habitat from warm lowland forest up to cold alpine mountain zone inside a park area of 754 square kilometers. A short visit to its Botanical Garden will not only be a good relaxing exercise, but will also improve a visitor’s knowledge about the flora and fauna at Kinabalu Park.

More about our Tour to Kinabalu Park

Raflessia Borneo

The Botanical Garden comprises 16 different trails such as the Silau Silau Trail and Bukit Tupai Trail. Depending on how much time you have on your hands, you can take your time to trek through and explore all the trails in the garden.

Along the way, you will encounter many unique species of trees and flowers such as orchids, Medinilla speciosa (Showy Asian Grapes), the Nepenthes rajah (pitcher plant) and so on. There will also be helpful signs and tags to help you find your way and identify the plants species that you encounter.

Mount Kinabalu Botanical Garden trail

The Kinabalu Park Botanical Garden is open daily from 9am to 1pm and from 2pm to 4pm. (Last entry: 3:40pm, gate closes at 4pm sharp). Entrance fee is RM5 for non-Malaysians and RM4 for Malaysians; (there is a 50% discount for visitors below 18 years old). Guided tours are also available at 9am, 12pm and 3pm daily.

More about our Tour to Kinabalu Park


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The term linangkit in general is used to refer to a special kind of needle work technique that is practiced by the women of several ethnic groups in the West and North of Sabah. The process of making this special Sabahan tapestry weave is somewhat similar to the European technique of ‘tatting’ or ‘frivolite’. Basically, […]

The term linangkit in general is used to refer to a special kind of needle work technique that is practiced by the women of several ethnic groups in the West and North of Sabah. The process of making this special Sabahan tapestry weave is somewhat similar to the European technique of ‘tatting’ or ‘frivolite’. Basically, the linangkit serves as decorative embroidery that embellishes the traditional attires of some the Sabahan ethnic groups.

Linangkit is created using a needle, wherein a thin thread is looped into countless interconnecting identical knots which produces a dense and strong fabric. The Sabahan linangkit tradition is believed to have originated from Kudat where the material culture displays strong Filipino influence.The Maranao and Magindanao people of the Mindanao Island in the Philippines create the langkit for the same purpose—decorating and joining two panels of hand-woven cloths. These are normally hand-woven at the loom.

However, some of the Filipino motifs seem to be older than the Sabahan ones, with the prevalence of prehistoric lozenges and hooks—which also appear in some of the Sabahan weaving, the Rungus floating weft motifs—though they are curiously absent from the linangkit motif inventory.

In these modern times, ‘tatting’ has become outdated as it requires time-consuming manual production methods. Apart from that, the age of the female makers is advancing each day. With the rapid urbanization process, it is questionable whether or not the skill is being passed onto the younger generation. It takes many laborious months to complete one piece of linangkit with its tiny knots.

The beautiful intricate details of the linangkit tapestry

The beautiful intricate details of the linangkit tapestry

 

Linangkit Makers in Sabah

The Dusun Kwijau in Keningau, Sabah’s interior, apply narrow strips of linangkit along the side seams of their ceremonial blouses. For the Papar Kadazan women, they traditionally decorate their knee length black skirts with a band of linangkit. However, in the modern days, it has conveniently been replaced by a panel of cross-stitch which is less complicated to be made.

In the black ceremonial costumes of the Lotud, the linangkit is a beautiful contrasting feature. Circular sashes, knee length skirts and the black below the waistband of the men’s trousers (binandus) are all adorned with the linangkit.

The wide continuous band displays a repetitive pattern with crosses (inspired by melon seeds) in the middle. These are usually surrounded by squares, built up of opposing triangles in contrasting colours. The squares are said to be a stylized beetle. Formerly, the curved iridescent hard wings of these same beetles were used to make the strings that dangle from the siwot (head décor).

For the Lotud women, the colour arrangement within the geometric motifs is a matter of personal taste, but like it is in any other districts; they stick to local traditions where the range of colours is concerned. Orange and red are the dominant colours, with smatterings of purple, green, yellow, as well as black and white for the smaller areas.

For the Bajau costume, a wide band of linangkit in the front of a long black matrimonial skirt used to be a tradition of the Bajau as well. For their wedding celebrations, the Bajau prefer motifs which represent the natural world which therefore, represents new life. Called berangkit by the Bajau, the linangkit on the bridal costume displays big stylized cotton flower (buna kapas) and bamboo shoot (pucuk rebung).

The Dusun Tindals in Tempasuk like to have linangkit on their wedding costumes. Men and women wear identical black blouses with linangkit running over the sleeves from the shoulders to the elbows. The sides running from the elbows to the wrists are slit open. Their sleeveless blouses also have linangkit along the seams.

In the Rungus version of linangkit, which they call rangkit, the geometric motifs are usually separated from one and the other in defined boxes or compartments. The Rungus women seem to favour a balance between warm and cool hues without any strongly dominant colour. The origin of most Rungus motifs is relatively easy to recognize as they’re taken from elements from daily life and nature such as butterflies, pythons, leaves, stars, shells, stairs, and the dog-paw prints.

The Pinakol motif of two diagonal lines represents the two sashes worn over the chest by men on ceremonial occasions. Linangkit also forms part of the Rungus costume for men (sarabulu) which is sewn below the waistband at the back of the trousers, like the costume for Lotud men.

It is fitted in two long strips into the sukolob, the calf length blue sarong which is the daily outfit of Rungus women. The sukolob is tied above the breasts.On the sukolob, one strip runs horizontal and the other encircles the hips. At the intersection, there is almost always a zigzag rice field-snake motif on the wider band going downwards. At the corners, radiating floral patterns are embroidered in a flat satin stitch.

Family holiday in Sabah is always a grand affair! There is something for absolutely everyone–whether it’s an island vacation, a camping trip in the jungle or a relaxing weekend at the countryside, we’ve got you covered. Here are six great places in Sabah to go on a family vacation in Sabah: 1. Kiram’s Village Cabin, […]

Family holiday in Sabah is always a grand affair! There is something for absolutely everyone–whether it’s an island vacation, a camping trip in the jungle or a relaxing weekend at the countryside, we’ve got you covered. Here are six great places in Sabah to go on a family vacation in Sabah:

Kiram's Village

1. Kiram’s Village Cabin, Mesilau Kundasang

With its spring-like weather all year round and tranquil surrounding, Kundasang is a perfect place to visit for a respite from the busy city life and the scorching tropical heat. With six quaint wooden cabins named after vegetables and fruit—Broccoli, Carrot, Chili & Onion, Celery & Tomato, Cabbage and Strawberry — Kiram’s Village Cabin can accommodate both large families and small ones.

The cabins are all equipped with basic holiday necessities such as kitchen utensils, BBQ pits and even cable TV. Apart from that, the rates offered are also very reasonable. Excellent for a budget-friendly fun-filled family holiday!

Sepilok Jungle Resort

2. Sepilok Jungle Resort, Sandakan

Dreaming of a tropical holiday with your family in a place surrounded by lush greenery and wildlife? Pack your bag as we’re going to Sepilok. Famous for its ‘wild man of Borneo’, Sepilok attracts many tourists each year who are drawn by the endearing antics of the orangutan. While you’re here, you can opt to stay at the Sepilok Jungle Resort and enjoy the best of Sabah’s tropical jungle.

In addition to reasonable rates, Sepilok Jungle Resort is also equipped with cozy cafes, swimming pools, convention halls, restaurants, a gym and a camping site for you and your clan to do a myriad of exciting activities.

Hibiscus Villa

3. Hibiscus Villa, Kudat

For a more luxurious family holiday like that of a high-class celebrity, the only place to be is Hibiscus Villa in Kudat.

Perched on a sprawling 2.5-acre tropical garden, the villa overlooks a stretch of white sandy beach, topped with the clear azure waters of the South China Sea. A beautifully designed Balinese architecture masterpiece, it is equipped with an 18-meter long infinity pool, a leisure area with cable TV and a tasteful assortment of DVDs and books, four bedrooms and two gazebos for you and your family to chill out or have a garden barbecue at. The villa also offers laundry and maid services for its guests.

Maranjak Longhouse

4. Maranjak Longhouse Lodge, Matunggong

If you’re planning on a fun and educational family vacation, why not participate in a homestay program?

Located in Kampung Bavanggazo, Matunggong—40 kilometers from Kudat town—Maranjak Longhouse Lodge (formerly known as Maranjak Homestay) provides a cultural exposure into the life of the Rungus people, the indigenous people of Kudat, who still live in bamboo-made longhouses.

Book a stay for the rest of the family and get a taste of Rungus delicacies, explore the verdant Kudat surroundings, learn to make traditional handicrafts and participate in numerous interesting activities together with the locals. It will provide your kids with a chance to meet to friends too.

Langkah Syabas

5. Langkah Syabas Beach Resort, Kinarut

Less than 30 minutes away from the city centre of Kota Kinabalu lies the idyllic Langkah Syabas Beach Resort which offers a wonderful beach vacation destination for a family retreat. Play sandcastle games with the kids or simply laze by the poolside with a good book, either way is fun.

When the kids are already tucked in bed, you and your partner might want to enjoy a glass of wine or two, complemented with the resort’s homemade cheese. On Sunday, gather the whole family for a sumptuous Sunday roast buffet lunch and savour hearty servings of traditional roasts, Yorkshire pudding and baked potatoes.

Need help with planning your family vacation? Get in touch with us! We are always happy to help you.

With the modern challenges of climbing the career ladder, looking great at every age and raising children, a woman’s gotta do what a woman’s gotta do to keep sane. The best and easiest way to do this is to make a spa appointment and treat yourself to an hour or two of decadence! Enter Jari […]

With the modern challenges of climbing the career ladder, looking great at every age and raising children, a woman’s gotta do what a woman’s gotta do to keep sane. The best and easiest way to do this is to make a spa appointment and treat yourself to an hour or two of decadence! Enter Jari Jari Spa — one of Sabah’s best known spa and wellness centre that specializes in traditional Borneo massage.

A well-known spa with many awards and accolades under its belt, Jari Jari Spa is mostly famous for its Dusun Lotud Inan therapy, which is a deep-tissue massage recommended to relieve body tension and invigorate the senses. For those who are in need of relaxation, there is the Palad therapy, which helps stimulate blood circulation and reduces stress. This massage is recommended for beginner massage enthusiasts as well as the elderly.

For the athletes and active people who are always on their feet, the Tanggara therapy is for you. A distinctive ‘mountain massage’ that incorporates firm thumb and palm pressure, this massage helps alleviate muscle tension and tiredness. This therapy also helps to calm and soothe body and mind. The Tanggara therapy starts from the legs and moves up toward the upper body. For each massage, you can opt to have it for either 60, 75, 90 or 120 minutes.

Each therapy begins with Floral Foot Soak and a warm layo tea (ginger tea) welcome drink.

After the foot soak, a professional therapist from Jari Jari will dry your feet and give them a brief massage before starting with your preferred treatment.

As a busy woman who is always running around, the Tanggara therapy is the one massage that I need in order to decompress and remove my muscle knots. When you book a massage with Jari Jari, you will have an option whether to have a male or female therapist to perform treatment.

Although most women would choose to have a female therapist and have reservations about choosing a male therapist, rest assured that the male therapists at Jari Jari are incredibly professional and just as sensitive to your needs as the lady therapists are. I was also informed that the European women tourists would normally prefer to have male therapists as their pressure are stronger and firmer.

If you are having soreness on your hips and legs after a jungle trekking activity or a marathon event, the Tanggara massage will surely help relieve the discomfort and get you up and running again in no time! All three signature massages uses their own aromatherapy oils, but if you are the ticklish type, do let your therapist know so that he or she can make the treatment oil-free.

After the massage, you can also opt for a herbal bath session (available only at the Palace Hotel and Tanjung Aru Plaza branches). In addition to massages, you can also book facials, an ear candling session, maternity treatment, hot stone treatment and many other treatment packages to suit your needs.

For more info, visit Jari Jari Spa’s website at www.jarijari.com.my. Guests who has tour bookings with Rustic Borneo will also receive special deals when booking a pampering session at Jari Jari Spa.

If you’re the adventurous type, there’s certainly no better way to get a feel of Sabah’s bucolic surroundings other than by touring on a mountain bike. There are plenty of cycling tours in Sabah to match your fitness level and risk aversion quotient. If you are the uber-adventurous with boundless energy type, you will love […]

If you’re the adventurous type, there’s certainly no better way to get a feel of Sabah’s bucolic surroundings other than by touring on a mountain bike.

There are plenty of cycling tours in Sabah to match your fitness level and risk aversion quotient. If you are the uber-adventurous with boundless energy type, you will love the 3D/2N Epic Mountain Biking tour. If you consider yourself a moderate adventure-seeking cyclist, the 2D/1N Mountain Biking and Homestay package will be a great option, in addition to letting you do some community work in Sabah. Alternatively, if you’re just like me, someone who hasn’t been on a bike for nearly five years and just want to have fun without killing yourself, the Kiulu Countryside Ride tour is just perfect!

Let’s go a-cycling!

The Kiulu Countryside Ride starts with a pick up at 8am from your hotel, or wherever it is your preferred pick-up place in Kota Kinabalu. From here, you will go on a 45-minute drive to the satellite town of Kiulu, near the Tamparuli town, which is famed for its legendary bridge — Jambatan Tamparuli.

The drive will be a pleasant one as your tour guide for the day introduces himself and shares some stories and urban legends from Sabah. One of the most memorable stories that our guide shared with us was the legend of Solungkoi — a local Dusun maiden who was said to have fallen in love with a British soldier and, due to jealousy, was offered as a sacrifice to the spirit of the Tamparuli Bridge. Such a sad love story!

The road leading to Kiulu is a scenic and peaceful one, dotted with trees and the occasional herd of buffalos frolicking by the roadside. The starting point of the cycling tour is at the Kiulu riverside, the same place where the white water rafting activity starts.

Before beginning the cycling tour, you will be given a short safety briefing and introduction on the route you were to take. The Kiulu Countryside Ride will take you across several suspension bridges, through fields, tarmac road and even graveled road by the riverside. You will get to enjoy the rustic countryside scenery and breathe the fresh kampung air.

Posing in the middle of the suspension bridge. It may look easy but riding a bicycle on a wobbly suspension bridge can be a bit scary for the uninitiated. It’s best to go slow or just walk across if you’re not confident riding the bike across the bridge.

The total distance covered in the Kiulu Countryside Ride is approximately 18 kilometers. After riding through the narrow village roads for about an hour, you will make a pit stop at one of the houses in the village where you will be served with local cakes and drinks.

After having your fill of local cakes and drinks, your guide will take you for a short hike into the village farm where you will be introduced to local plants, such as the tembaga (copper) banana tree and other edible shrubs that you can eat, if you ever get lost in the Bornean jungle. Here, you will also be given a rubber-tapping demo by one of the villagers, in case you’re interested in a career change. Depending on the season, you may also get a chance to try out paddy planting and paddy harvesting at the paddy field.

The journey to cover the other half of your journey resumes after this, starting with a refreshing ride through the rubber estate. This was my favourite part of the journey as the path through the forest is cool and shaded, with soft breeze caressing against my skin. Emerging from the rubber estate, you will get to ride along the Kiulu riverside. On hot days, you will be utterly tempted to jump in and swim!


By the River Kiulu we stood and posed for a picture…

The toughest challenge will come just before reaching the end point. This time, instead of riding under cool, shady trees, you will be riding on the tarmac road with a slightly ascending slope. On particularly hot days, the sun will be beating down on your back mercilessly, therefore, never ever skip sunscreen! You are also advised to keep hydrated at all times, as to avoid getting a heat stroke.

At around half past noon, we finally arrived at the cycling terminus where we enjoyed a simple local buffet lunch before being transferred back to KK. It was definitely a great experience for us and a fun way to get some exercise done!

We’ve been working on adding more content to the Rustic Borneo YouTube Channel, because if a picture paints a thousand words, the each video is a library. That’s why whenever the team from Rustic Borneo goes out to experience the products we offer, we often take a camera or two with us to capture the […]

We’ve been working on adding more content to the Rustic Borneo YouTube Channel, because if a picture paints a thousand words, the each video is a library.

That’s why whenever the team from Rustic Borneo goes out to experience the products we offer, we often take a camera or two with us to capture the experience as best we can, considering we’re not professional video producers.

We have a modest-but-growing collection of videos on the main channel. Of special interest is our Borneo Travel Guide playlist embedded below. These particular videos are representative of travel packages that we offer, which means if you want to experience what you see for yourself, just get in touch with us and we’ll make the arrangements for you.

 

 

There are more videos, some of which gives an overview of Kota Kinabalu, at the Rustic Borneo YouTube Channel, so do visit us on YouTube and see what we (and Sabah, Borneo) has to offer. We cover Danum Valley, our popular Sabah cooking class, Mt. Kinabalu & Via Ferrata, Borneo Paragliding, elephants and orangutans in Sukau on the Kinabatangan, Biking in Borneo and, our most watched video, The Coral Flyer Zipline.

We current aim to add a new video to the channel every 2 weeks, or so. If you want to stay in the loop and receive a notification when our next video is ready, then do subscribe to the Rustic Borneo YouTube Channel by clicking the button below.

You’re more than welcome to participate on the channel by commenting on what you’re seeing, good, bad or of what you’d like to see more.

For tailor-made Borneo holiday packages, accommodation and tours, contact us or, if you’re already in Kota Kinabalu, drop by the Traveller Service Centre for a chat about what to do and where to go in Sabah.

Sabahans are fiercely proud of their culinary scene and with so many delicious dishes, who can blame them? From noodles to rice, pork to lamb, Chinese, Indian and Malay all mixed together, the tastes and aromas are endless. Acquire some of Sabah’s food secrets with our cooking class activity. Many a visitor returns from their […]

Sabahans are fiercely proud of their culinary scene and with so many delicious dishes, who can blame them? From noodles to rice, pork to lamb, Chinese, Indian and Malay all mixed together, the tastes and aromas are endless. Acquire some of Sabah’s food secrets with our cooking class activity.

Many a visitor returns from their holiday in Sabah only to crave the tastes of Borneo.

The best home cooked dishes are made from fresh, local produce bought at the daily market. Visit a market where you’ll learn what is required and try to pick the best of what you need.